‘Today is filled with possibilities and opportunities, leading us to a better future!’

State Superintendent Tony Evers, a staunchly pro-public education Democrat, is Wisconsin’s new governor, defeating incumbent Republican Scott Walker, long known for his attacks on public schools and educators.

WEAC President Ron Martin applauded WEAC members for their hard work in helping to elect Evers.

“Today is filled with possibilities and opportunities, leading us to a better future,” Martin said in a video message to members. “This victory belongs to you. But more importantly, it belongs to our kids.”

Public education champion Tony Evers is Wisconsin’s new governor!

State Superintendent Tony Evers, a staunchly pro-public education Democrat, is Wisconsin’s new governor, defeating incumbent Republican Scott Walker, long known for his attacks on public schools and educators.

WEAC President Ron Martin applauded WEAC members for their hard work in helping to elect Evers.

“Today is filled with possibilities and opportunities, leading us to a better future,” Martin said in a video message to members. “This victory belongs to you. But more importantly, it belongs to our kids.”

As State Superintendent, Evers has proposed increasing public school funding by $1.4 billion, has said he will freeze the school voucher program as a first step toward its eventual phase-out, strongly supports community schools that help meet the needs of students and families in the local community, and plans to place in statute requirements for teacher voice to be part of all education-related decision and policy-making initiatives.

“We have lots of work to do now,” Martin said. “We have a partner who’s willing to listen to us, and we need to be there to provide the kind of advice and support that he will need to lead this state.

“We had a part in this victory, and I couldn’t be more proud of the WEAC members who participated. The work you did will not go unnoticed,” Martin said.

“And now we go back to our classes and we do what we do every single day, and that’s make life better for students. And you can count on WEAC to be there to support you, so you can focus on your students.”

In other statewide races, U.S. Senator Tammy Baldwin easily won re-election over Republican challenger Leah Vukmir, while Democrat Josh Kaul was narrowly leading incumbent Attorney General Brad Schimel with 99 percent of the vote in. Secretary of State Doug La Follette was re-elected, and Sarah Godlewski was elected State Treasurer. Republicans came out of the election holding majorities in both houses of the Legislature.

Read more:

Tony Evers defeats Scott Walker in Wisconsin’s governor’s race

After upending Wisconsin politics and infuriating liberals across the country, Gov. Scott Walker narrowly lost his bid for a third term to Tony Evers.

Tony Evers beats Scott Walker to win Wisconsin governor’s race in nail-biter

Democrat Tony Evers has won the Wisconsin governor’s race in a stunning upset of two-term Republican incumbent Scott Walker.

Evers launches ‘Tour for Change’ in closing days of campaign for governor

 

As the campaign for governor enters its last few days, Democratic candidate Tony Evers is touring the state in a school bus, outlining the sharp differences between himself and incumbent Scott Walker, who is well known for attacking public school educators and gutting funds for public education. Evers’ Tour for Change began Wednesday and continues through Monday, the day before the election. Below are scheduled bus tour stops as of Thursday, November 1.

Eau Claire:

W.R. Davies Student Center

77 Roosevelt Ave

Eau Claire, WI 54701

Thursday, November 1

Time: 12:15PM

events.mobilizeamerica.io/dpw/event/83074/

 

Hudson:

Hop and Barrel

310 2nd St

Hudson, WI 54016

Thursday, November 1

Time: 2:45PM

events.mobilizeamerica.io/dpw/event/83075/

 

Superior:

Thirsty Pagan Brewing

1623 Broadway St

Superior, WI 54880

Thursday, November 1

Time: 6:45PM

events.mobilizeamerica.io/dpw/event/83078/

 

Ashland:

Blue Wave Inn

2521 Lake Shore Dr W

Ashland, WI 54806

Thursday, November 1

Time: 9:15PM

events.mobilizeamerica.io/dpw/event/83081/

 

Rhinelander:

Rhinelander Cafe + Pub

33 N Brown Street

Rhinelander, WI 54501

Friday, November 2

Time: 9:45AM

events.mobilizeamerica.io/dpw/event/83083/

 

Wausau:

Marathon County Democratic Party

833 S 3rd Ave

Wausau, WI 54401

Friday, November 2

Time: 12:15PM

events.mobilizeamerica.io/dpw/event/83085/

 

Stevens Point:

Location TBD

Friday, November 2

events.mobilizeamerica.io/dpw/event/83087/

 

Oshkosh:

Winnebago County Democratic Party Office

480 N Main St

Oshkosh, WI 54901

Friday, November 2

Time: 4:15PM

events.mobilizeamerica.io/dpw/event/83088/

 

Manitowoc:

Ryans on York

712 York St

Manitowoc, WI 54220

Friday, November 2

Time: 6:15PM

events.mobilizeamerica.io/dpw/event/83093/

 

Green Bay:

Teamsters Local Union 662

1546 Main St

Green Bay, WI 54302

Saturday, November 3

Time: 8:45AM

events.mobilizeamerica.io/dpw/event/83096/

 

Appleton:

Outagamie Democratic Party

Saturday, November 3

2701 N Oneida St

Appleton, WI 54911

Time: 11:30AM

events.mobilizeamerica.io/dpw/event/83098/

 

Fond du Lac

Fond Du Lac Democratic Party

239 S. Main St

Fond du Lac, WI 54935

Saturday, November 3

Time: 1:15PM

events.mobilizeamerica.io/dpw/event/83102/

 

Plymouth

The Hub

1611 Eastern Avenue

Plymouth, WI 53073

Saturday, November 3

Time: 2:45PM

events.mobilizeamerica.io/dpw/event/83106/

 

Waukesha

Waukesha County Democratic Party Office

336 Wisconsin Ave

Waukesha, WI 53186

Saturday, November 3

Time: 5:15PM

events.mobilizeamerica.io/dpw/event/83107/

 

Milwaukee

Bay View Office

2999 S. Delaware Ave

Milwaukee, WI 53702

Saturday, November 3

Time: 7:45PM

events.mobilizeamerica.io/dpw/event/83109/

 

Racine

Racine County Democratic Party office

507 6th Street

Racine, WI 53403

Sunday, November 4

events.mobilizeamerica.io/dpw/event/83110/

 

Kenosha

UAW Local 72 Union Hall

3615 Washington Rd

Kenosha, WI 53144

Sunday, November 4

Time: 2:45PM

events.mobilizeamerica.io/dpw/event/83113/

 

Milwaukee

Coordinated Campaign southside office

725 W. Historic Mitchell Street

Milwaukee, WI 53204

Sunday, November 4

Time: 4:45PM

events.mobilizeamerica.io/dpw/event/83116/

 

Beloit

Location TBD

Monday, November 5

Time: 10:30AM

events.mobilizeamerica.io/dpw/event/83125/

 

Janesville

Janesville Coordinated Campaign Office

50 S Main St.

Janesville, WI 53545

Monday, November 5

Time: 11:45AM

events.mobilizeamerica.io/dpw/event/83127/

 

Whitewater

TBD

Monday, November 5

Time: 1:15PM

events.mobilizeamerica.io/dpw/event/83129/

 

Madison

TBD

Monday, November 5

Time: 4:45PM

events.mobilizeamerica.io/dpw/event/83130/

There’s only one education champion in Wisconsin’s race for governor, and that’s Tony Evers

The following article, written by Amanda Litvinov, originally appeared on the NEA website EducationVotes.org:

Keep up with the latest election news on the WEAC Politics & Elections Board.

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker has taken to calling himself a “pro-education governor” — a laughable claim to educators in the state.

Here are just a few reasons to question Walker’s commitment to education:

  • During Walker’s first five years, he cut state funding for K-12 schools by $1.2 billion. It was a devastating blow to the state’s public schools.
  • Walker has worked hard to expand the state’s voucher program. Like Betsy DeVos, Walker supports diverting scarce public school funding to private schools through such schemes. Vouchers have not been shown to significantly improve student performance, but they have been shown to undermine student civil rights.
  • Under Walker, public university funding was slashed by $250 million.
  • Walker stripped educators and other public workers of collective bargaining rights, despite public outcry. Unions bargain for better working conditions for educators, as well as students’ learning conditions.

Walker’s record could not be more dismal on education. Standing in sharp contrast is his opponent, a proven champion of public education.

Dr. Tony Evers has decades of experience in public education, serving first as a classroom teacher, then as principal and the state superintendent of public instruction.  Here are his plans and priorities:

  • Evers’ budget plan increases public school funding by $1.4 billion. It restores the state’s commitment to covering two-thirds of public education funding, and increases the state’s share of special education funding to 60 percent.
  • Evers will freeze the school voucher program as a first step toward its eventual phase-out.
  • He strongly supports: community schools that help meet the needs of students and families in the local community; expanding mental health services; increased funding for education support professionals.
  • Evers plans to place in statute requirements for teacher voice to be part of all education-related decision and policy-making initiatives.
SHARE on Facebook.

“We – and I – have been waiting for this day for a long, long time,” Evers said at an election rally in September. “We’re going to take back control of our schools.”

Evers earned the recommendation of the Wisconsin Education Association Council (WEAC), the state’s largest educator union. Members like Kay Hansen, a special needs paraeducator and WEAC member, are highly enthusiastic about the upcoming election.

“As a special education paraprofessional in a rural, northeastern Wisconsin school, I see firsthand how Scott Walker’s huge cuts to public schools have hurt my most vulnerable students,” said Hansen.

“Dr. Evers, on the other hand, is a teacher himself and has vowed to restore state funding for my special education students.”

Evers listens to the concerns of educators like Hansen for their students and their profession.

“Our educators are on the front lines of these challenges, so when they speak up about bad education policy, deteriorating schools, or the massive teacher exodus we’re facing, they’re doing right by our kids,” said Evers at a gathering of WEAC educators in September.

“They’re reminding us that education — like democracy — doesn’t come for free. It must be nurtured, sustained, and invested in over time.”

This is an 11.0101(10)(b)(1) communication with WEAC members.

 

Mother Jones: How parents and teachers ‘could expel Scott Walker from office’

A new article from Mother Jones expertly summarizes the race for Wisconsin governor, pitting pro-public education candidate Tony Evers against Scott Walker, who began his term in 2011 by attacking and undermining the state’s public employees, including teachers and education support professionals, and then followed up with massive cuts to Wisconsin’s public schools. The article points out:

During his first five years in office, Walker cut education spending by a total of $1.2 billion. More recently, he’s increased funding somewhat, though not enough to offset the damage caused by the earlier reductions.

The result has been disastrous. Districts around the state face applicant shortages when trying to fill job openings, as teachers look for work in other states and new college graduates avoid the profession altogether. Between the 2011-12 and 2015-16 school years, median compensation for Wisconsin’s public school teachers fell 12.6 percent, a reduction in wages and benefits of nearly $11,000 annually, according to a study by the left-leaning Center for American Progress. “We’ve been nonstop battling the effects of [Act 10],” says Amy Mizialko, the president of the Milwaukee teachers’ union. “Our students have suffered greatly as a result.” …

“To beat Scott Walker, we need a stronger vision for our future,” Evers says in his first TV ad. “Instead of investing…in handouts to companies like Foxconn, I’m gonna invest in our kids and our workers…I’m going to make sure that every kid gets a great school, no matter what the zip code.”

Read the entire article:

Will pissed-off parents and teachers expel Scott Walker from office?

Tom Rulseh was baffled by the email from an angry constituent. Why, the woman demanded to know, had the Three Lakes School District allowed Gov. Scott Walker to film a campaign ad in a public school that had nearly been forced to close thanks in part to Walker’s own budget cuts?

PBS News Hour: Education is at the heart of the Wisconsin race for governor

Education is front and center in the race for Wisconsin governor, and the PBS News Hour took a close look at the radically different approaches the two candidates – incumbent Scott Walker and State Superintendent Tony Evers – have on the subject. The report begins with Evers visiting a Milwaukee public school on the first day of school, while Walker is at a charter school in Waukesha.

Heather DuBois Bourenane, executive director of the Wisconsin Public Education Network, put it all in perspective, proudly displaying her T-shirt that says: “I Love My Public School and I Vote!”

“It’s about making sure that whomever gets elected is held accountable to the highest possible standard of doing the right things for kids in schools,” she says.

“Clearly, my lifelong journey has been all about public education and being a teacher and an administrator,” Evers says. “And, frankly, I have fought for our schools, instead of bringing them down.”

Watch the PBS News Hour report:

School concerns spur passions in Wisconsin governor’s race

In Wisconsin’s race for governor, 40 percent of voters say education is their first or second most important concern. The Republican incumbent, Gov. Scott Walker, is squaring off against the state’s longtime superintendent of schools, Tony Evers. Polls indicate the race is too close to call. Special correspondent Lisa Stark of Education Week reports.

Evers calls for restoring respect for Wisconsin’s schools and educators

Wisconsin must restore respect for Wisconsin’s public schools and educators and listen to teachers and education support professionals, who have the best interests of students at heart, State  Superintendent Tony Evers said Thursday in his annual State of Education Address.

“Our educators are on the front lines of these challenges,” he said “So when they speak up about bad education policy, deteriorating schools, or the massive teacher exodus we’re facing, they’re doing right by our kids. And we should listen. They’re reminding us that education – like democracy – doesn’t come for free. It must be nurtured, sustained, and invested in over time.”

Evers called for reinvesting in public schools, “so that every kid can thrive.”

“Together,” he said, “we can bring civility and collaboration back to public education and to public life.”

Evers said education remains – as it has always been – “the great equalizer” and the pathway to prosperity, as well as the key to a skilled workforce and a robust economy.

But, he said, Wisconsin’s priorities are out of whack.

“Today in Wisconsin we’re spending less on our public schools than we did eight years ago – putting us below the national average. We serve over 50,000 English learners – and that number is growing. We serve over 120,000 special needs students. Four in every 10 kids are economically disadvantaged. 

“A decade of disinvestment hasn’t magically solved problems, increased student performance, or improved our competitive edge. Divisive solutions from Washington and Madison haven’t made things better. These policies are failing us. But the people of Wisconsin know there’s a better way.”

Evers noted that over the past few years, more than 1.1 million residents throughout the state rallied behind public education and voted to raise their own taxes to support their schools. 

“Now is the time to adopt a transformational education budget that responds to this call,” he said. “A budget that provides educators what they deserve: the resources they need to meet the needs of our kids. A budget that increases opportunities, closes gaps, and allows for competitive compensation. 

“We must continue raising our voices until they can no longer be ignored,” Evers concluded. “Together, we can restore respect for Wisconsin schools and educators. Together, we can reinvest in our schools so that every kid can thrive. Together, we can bring civility and collaboration back to public education and to public life.”

Read more about Evers’ budget proposal:

Evers’ budget plan increases public school funding by $1.4 billion, achieves two-thirds state funding of schools

Evers’ budget plan increases public school funding by $1.4 billion, achieves two-thirds state funding of schools

State Superintendent Tony Evers on Sunday unveiled a state education budget proposal that increases state funding of public K-12 schools by $1.4 billion over the next two years and achieves two-thirds state funding of education. 

“The budget I’m submitting responds to the very real challenges our schools and educators face each and every day,” Evers said. “It changes how we fund our schools and provides resources to our educators to meet the needs of every child.”

Specifically, the budget: 

  • Makes an unprecedented $600 million investment in special education, increasing the reimbursement rate from 25 percent to 60 percent, while expanding funding for English learners and rural schools.
  • Provides nearly $64 million more for student mental health funding, a tenfold increase.
  • Funds full-day 4-year-old kindergarten for the state’s youngest learners, creates the state’s first funding stream for after-school programs, and establishes new opportunities for children in the largest urban school districts.
  • Reforms the state’s broken school finance system to help districts of all sizes, including revenue limit fairness so lower spending districts can catch up and all districts can plan for the future. 

“Our students deserve our support as they prepare to inherit this great state,” Evers said. “As parents, fellow educators, taxpayers, and citizens of Wisconsin, I ask for your support during the 2019-21 biennial budget process so that every child gets a shot at a great Wisconsin education.” 

State budget highlights:

2019-21 State Budget Information

State Superintendent Tony Evers is rolling out major budget requests for the 2019-2021 biennium. Information will be added here as it becomes ready. Topics:

Read more:

Tony Evers calls for nearly $1.7 billion hike in state funding for K-12 schools

Wisconsin’s K-12 public schools would receive a nearly $1.7 billion increase in state funding over the current budget cycle under state Superintendent Tony Evers’ two-year budget proposal released Sunday. Evers, the Democrat challenging Gov. Scott Walker in the Nov.

 

Evers to face Walker on November 6

Tony Evers

State Superintendent Tony Evers will face Scott Walker in the November 6 election for Wisconsin governor. Evers handily won the eight-candidate Democratic Primary election Tuesday. On the Republican side, Walker easily defeated little known Robert Meyer of Sun Prairie.

In an email to supporters after winning the nomination, Evers said:

“This race is a choice between 4 more years of Scott Walker putting Scott Walker first, or a new governor focused on making decisions in the best interest of real Wisconsin families — who deserve access to good healthcare, safe roads and high quality public education.”

In other races on Tuesday:

  • Lieutenant Governor: Democrat Rep. Mandela Barnes of Milwaukee will be paired with Evers as the lieutenant governor candidate. Incumbent Republican Lieutenant Governor Rebecca Kleefisch was uncontested in the primary.
  • State Treasurer: Businesswoman Sarah Godlewski, who was recommended by the WEAC Board, won the Democratic nomination for State Treasurer. The Republican candidate will be Travis Hartwig.
  • Secretary of State: Incumbent Doug La Follette won the Democratic nomination. Republican businessman Jay Schroeder will challenge La Follette in November.
  • U.S. Senate: Republican State Senator Leah Vukmir of Brookfield advanced to take on Democratic U.S. Senator Tammy Baldwin in November.

Read about other Primary Election results:

Election results: Wisconsin and Milwaukee-area August 2018 primary election

Wisconsin and Milwaukee-area residents head to the polls on August 14 to vote in a number of contested state and local primary races. Here’s who’s on the ballot.

More Resources:

Evers says his ‘transformational budget’ will fund 4-year-old kindergarten for all students and achieve two-thirds state funding of schools

State Superintendent Tony Evers said Wednesday that he will propose a “transformational budget” that provides full funding of 4-year-old kindergarten and achieve the state’s longtime commitment of funding two-thirds the cost of local public schools “without any gimmicks while holding the line on taxes.”

“No more false choices. There’s a better way, and that is the high road,” Evers said in opening remarks at the Wisconsin Public Education Network Summer Summit at Appleton North High School.

“We need to prioritize mental health, we need to shatter the decade-long freeze on special education funding, we need to reform our broken school funding system, and we need to restore and expand crucial student support services,” Evers said.

WEAC President Ron Martin welcomed Evers’ proposals, adding, “Investing in our public schools is essential to building a strong Wisconsin. For the past seven years we have – under the current governor – experienced extreme cuts to our public schools that have hurt our schools and kids while contributing to the low morale of educators. These proposals by State Superintendent Evers begin the process of turning that around.”

Evers reiterated his proposals to increase student mental health funding tenfold, direct unused school safety funds to student mental health services and shatter the decades-long freeze on special education funding by increasing funding 163%.

“Your leadership on this issue has to happen,” he said. “We need this reality.”

Saying that Wisconsin’ school funding formula has been broken for a long time, Evers said that in order to fix it, “it is time to do more than just shuffle the deck chairs, it has to increase opportunities to close those achievement gaps for kids.”

To address the achievement gaps, Evers said his budget proposal will include:

  • Funds to provide full-day 4-year-old kindergarten for all students in Wisconsin.
  • An unprecedented $20 million state investment in expanding and supporting high-quality after-school programs. “We all know our students need many caring, stable adults in their lives to nurture them, to help them be safe and to reach their full potential,” and these after-school programs will be “difference-makers,” especially in rural areas, he said.
  • Increase the low revenue ceilings so all districts – not just a few – can catch up. “There is no reason that in some districts a kid is supported by $18,000 while in another district by $9,600. That is patently unfair.”

In thanking Summer Summit attendees for their work in support of public schools, Evers said, “Advocacy around public schools has never been more important. We can make a huge difference in our kids’ lives. This is the year we can make that happen.”