Back to School Supply Drive for North Division High School

The Milwaukee Teachers’ Education Association has teamed up with WEA Member Benefits for our “Back to School” supply drive for Milwaukee Public Schools students.

As MPS students head back to school, many are in need of basic school supplies. High schools often get overlooked for supply drives, which is why we are going to make sure every North Division High School student can start off on the right foot with the school supplies they need.

Please help us make sure every North Division student starts the year off with backpack full of fresh school supplies.

School supplies can be dropped off at the Milwaukee Teachers’ Education Association office on 51st and Vliet Street Monday-Thursday from 8am-5:30pm or Friday from 8am-5pm.
Supplies most needed include:

  • College-Ruled Notebooks
  • Two-pocket folders
  • College-Ruled Lined paper
  • #2 pencils
  • Red, black, and blue ink pens
  • Backpacks

Financial contributions can also be dropped off at the MTEA office. For questions, please call MTEA at 414-259-1990.

Thank you to our friends at WEA Member Benefits for your generous contributions to North Division students!

Mark your calendars:

The North Division High School Drumline, Majorettes and Major are tentatively scheduled to make a special appearance at the 2018 Labor Day Parade September 3.

The parade begins at 11am from Zeidler Union Square to the Summerfest Grounds for Laborfest 2018.

Thousands Protest to Demand a Student Centered Budget

Photo credit: Joe Brusky

In an incredible show of solidarity and strength, well over 3,000 MPS education workers, parents, students, and community members picketed up and down Vliet Street outside of MPS Central Office. Quickly, the crowd grew so large that Vliet St. was closed as the picketers spilled into the street and took over 5 city blocks.

Photo credit: Joe Brusky

Neeskara and Sherman Elementary school nurse Maggie Mitchell’s sign points out the inequities Milwaukee Public School students face. MPS students are worth thousands of dollars less per pupil in the eyes of the state’s funding formula when compared to their surrounding suburban counterparts. This means nurses have to purchase their own band aids and other materials students need (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

 

Workers from all over the city joined the picket. Unions representing transit workers, healthcare workers, electrical workers, communication workers, postal workers, auto workers, delivery drivers, and museum workers all came out to support MPS students and educators in our fight for a fair budget. Many groups representing making up the pro-public education Schools and Communities United coalition were also present.

Photo credit: Joe Brusky

Photo credit: Joe Brusky

Educators from Madison, Racine, Kenosha, and the greater Milwaukee area also came out in support.

Photo credit: Joe Brusky

Massive 24-foot parachute banners were unfurled and carried by the crowd.

Parachute banners painted with messages were walked on the picket. Parachute on left: “Community Schools Build Democracy (with “I Matter” photo. Parachute on the right: “Public Education the Heart of the Community (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

Students and adults alike run underneath the parachutes as they are lifted up into the air (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

The picket was so large, MTEA President Kim Schroeder and Vice President Amy Mizialko climbed up on the roof of the union office to address the crowd.

Photo credit: Joe Brusky

Their message was simple: These cuts are an attack on every MPS student and education worker in this district and we will reject any budget that does further harm to our schools. It doesn’t have to be this way. MPS has a billion dollar budget, and cuts can and must be made farther from the classroom.

“Specials” refers to art, music, and physical education classes in MPS (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

A Neeskara School parent with her children highlighting the much-reduced schedule of art, music, and physical education classes in MPS (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

Click here for more photos from the picket.

To cap off the evening, our entire line headed towards the front door of central office. The doors were locked despite the public school board meeting that was to be held inside. Picketers began knocking on the locked front doors and chanted, “This is a public meeting, let us in!” When the doors were finally opened a loud line of educators, parents, and students streamed through the hallways, chanting to remind the MPS Administration and School Board of our demands.

“This is a public meeting! Let us in!” chant outside MPS Central Office (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

Youth Empowered in the Struggle students lead chants inside Central Office and outside the school board meeting (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

Chanting through the halls of Central Office (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

Even the Rufus King drumline joined in.

Photo credit: Joe Brusky

Our action yesterday showed our strength and demonstrated our commitment to our students. We will continue to fight against cuts that hurt students and education workers.

Where do we go from here?

Here are key dates and events for you to remember as we fight back cuts to students and educators.
Superintendent Driver’s Preliminary Budget Released

– Friday, April 27

 

Milwaukee Teachers’ Education Association (MTEA) Facebook Livestream Reaction to Budget

– Sunday, April 29 at 5pm
MTEA Executive Board Meets to Determine Next Steps

– Wednesday, May 2

 

Facebook Livestream to MTEA Members

– Wednesday, May 2 at 7:30pm or immediately following the MTEA Executive Board Meeting

First MPS Budget Hearing

– Thursday, May 3 at MPS Central Office (Time to be determined)

 

Further actions to come to WIN for our students!

Educators Must Fight for Our Students and Lead the Way Forward!

Photo of textbooks in an MPS classroom (Photo: Joe Brusky).

Milwaukee Public School students and classrooms have been systematically defunded. Tattered textbooks, crowded classrooms, and shrinking art, music, and physical education classes are just a few of the consequences our students and educators face thanks to Scott Walker’s unprecedented public education cuts. In addition to Walker’s cuts, MPS students also face a structural disparity in per pupil funding when compared to their suburban counterparts.

MPS administration has for too long accepted and passed these cuts on to our students and classrooms. Top this with the fact administration continues to entertain toxic proposals from privatizers that will hand over our schools to private operators. Enough! When will administration put their foot down and demand better for our students?

Riverside High School students and educators rallied and walked in together on Tuesday morning to call attention to the cuts (Photo: Joe Brusky).

Now MPS is proposing an additional 5% across the board cut to students and schools and massive healthcare and benefits cuts to the same education workers already burdened by years of cuts. MPS educators have stepped in to fill the void left by state budgets by purchasing snacks, clothing, and basic classroom supplies for their students, but our students deserve fully funded classrooms, not charity.

We’re tired of our Governor, other politicians who refuse to act, and an MPS administration who continues to pass cuts on to students and classrooms. We’ve had enough and we’re fighting back!

Over 1,500 educators, parents, and community supporters packed MPS Central Office on Tuesday to demand a better budget.

Last Tuesday, the MPS Central Office auditorium, three overflow rooms, and hallways were filled to capacity with educators, parents, and students to demand a better budget. Many MTEA and community members as well as students spoke out against the proposed cuts. Join us for these coming events as we continue to fight to demand our students & educators have the resources they deserve:

• Keep budget cuts away from schools!
• Time for teachers and educational assistants to meet the needs of their students.
• Quality affordable healthcare for ALL full-time education workers – including subs!
• Raises to attract and retain the education workers our students deserve.

Upcoming Events

4/18 Community Planning Meeting

MTEA is calling for an all MPS parent, student, and community member meeting to discuss cuts to our schools and next steps. Please invite parents and neighbors to attend this important meeting

RSVP to attend

Facebook Event Page

4/24 Picket to Defend Our Schools

Last Tuesday, the MPS Central Office auditorium, three overflow rooms, and hallways were filled to capacity with educators, parents, and students to demand a better budget. Many MTEA and community members as well as students spoke out against the proposed cuts.

RSVP to attend

Facebook Event page

To download the April 24 sign up sheet, click here. 

Riverside Rallies & Walks In to Say NO to Massive Budget Cuts to Students & Schools from MTEA Union on Vimeo.

Art Build in Support of the Milwaukee “March for Our Lives

DSC06823 copy

“We are demanding action. It is our time as youth in the community to make a difference. It is our time to stand up and speak out to our state and local politicians.”

– Marvell Reed, Barack Obama School of Career and Technical Education sophomore

 

On February 28, we attended a press conference organized by a group of students from around Southeastern Wisconsin, including Marvell announcing a March 24th march entitled the “March for Our Lives – Milwaukee.” The students announced they would be joining the nationwide day of action in support of legislative action on school gun violence and in response to the horrific events at Marjory Stoneman Douglas in Parkland, Florida. The resurgence of student activism in Parkland, around the nation, and here in Wisconsin is inspiring. Milwaukee educators wanted to support the students’ efforts and organized an art build to prepare posters and banners for the march.

Milwaukee artists Paul Kjelland and Nicolas Lampert screen print posters at the art build (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

 

Just Seeds artists Nicolas Lampert and Paul Kjelland, and University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee professor Kim Cosier collaborated with MTEA social media organizer Joe Brusky to plan and organize the art build. A date was set one week in advance of the March 24 marches. Organizers made a call on social media for public school students and local artists to submit images to be used in the march using the slogan “PROTECT STUDENTS NOT GUNS.”

Photo credit: Joe Brusky

 

Students and local artists submitted several stunning images. Nearly every image was used for the final poster and banner designs, with several of the artists also volunteering their Saturday to trace and paint banners, and run and screen print posters.

Nearly one hundred people, many students, came through the art build during the nine-hour Saturday time window, including the core group of students organizing the march. Dozens of MTEA members, local artists, and community supporters also joined the collective effort.

Photo credit: Joe Brusky

 

1,000 of these “Enough” images were printed. Bay View High School students and their art teacher Bryce Coppersmith submitted this powerful design.

Bay View art teacher Bryce Coppersmith poses with the design he and his students collectively created (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

 

Bryce also spent the day painting posters and banners in support of his students. The poster will be given out on a first come first serve basis before the 3/24 march.

Allen Field art teacher Kristin Cheever makes some finishing touches on a poster (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

The prints were lined up along the floor of the Kenilworth Building to dry after being screen printed (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

King Elementary educator Angela Harris and her two daughters Trinity and Zaire (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

 

Artist Pete Railand submitted this stunning “Protect Students not Guns” image of two students walking to school holding hands casting a shadow encasing the message “Protect Students not Guns.” 1,000 of these posters were also screen printed and will too be given out before the march.

This “Protect Students Not Guns” image was created by artist Pete Railand (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

Obama sophomore and March for Our Lives – Milwaukee organizer Marvell Reed holds a completed poster (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

Daisy was one of the youngest helpers at the art build (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

 

This powerful “Text Message” image was submitted by Milwaukee School of the Arts student Ana Branderhorst.

Homestead student and March for Our Lives – Milwaukee organizer Sophia Zhang trace banner before it is painted (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

 

Milwaukee student Trenice Ferguson submitted this moving image of a peaceful school community nestled on the inside of a hand gun.

Milwaukee School of Languages student Joya Headley and Homestead student Sophie Zhange (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

Elisha Branch and her daughter Daisy (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

 

MTEA retired member Susan Simensky-Bietila and her son painted this image, submitted by Susan’s 7-year old granddaughter, on a banner.

Retired member Susan Simensky Bietila and her son paint her granddaughter’s image on a banner (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

Photo credit: Joe Brusky

 

UWM art education teacher Kim Cosier submitted this banner design, which was painted on two banners.

UWM professor Kim Cosier (Photo credit: Joe Brusky)

Photo credit: Joe Brusky

 

Several students from Shorewood High School also joined the art build to trace and paint three banners for their sure to be historic 50-mile march from Madison to Rep. Paul Ryan in Janesville, Wisconsin. The students chose Janesville to call attention to politicians like Ryan, who take large sums of money from the National Rifle Association (NRA) and do nothing to address the growing siege of school gun violence.

Photo credit: Joe Brusky

Photo credit: Joe Brusky

 

Leaders Igniting Transformation students not only volunteered at the art build, but they also used the opportunity to circulate their petition to bring an end to the MPS School-To-Prison pipeline.

Photo credit: Joe Brusky

 

It was powerful to watch students, educators, artists, and community supporters working together, forging new networks, relationships, and ideas that can propel and sustain us all for this sure to be long fight.

Student organizers for the March for Our Lives Milwaukee (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

 

The 2,000 posters created will be handed out before the march at the meet-up for the MTEA educator contingent (10th St. side of the Milwaukee County Courthouse) on Saturday on a first-come-first serve basis (One poster per person). It will be powerful to see these images, posters, and banners backing up the great organizing students are doing locally as well as nationally. Together we will win common-sense reforms for our students. We hope you will join us.

Photo credit: Joe Brusky

More photo from the art build here.

Call for Student Art Submissions for Milwaukee “March for Our Lives”

Obama School of Career and Technical Education student and Milwaukee March for Our Lives organizer Marvell Reed holds a sign at a press conference at Homestead High School announcing the day and time of the march (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

Since the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in which 14 students and 3 educators were killed and 14 others were wounded, students and educators have been the most outspoken advocates for ensuring that all students have the support to learn, starting with school communities that are safe from gun violence.

A student works at the Milwaukee Art Build for Public Education that took place in the Riverwest neighborhood and ws organized by MTEA members last February (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

Milwaukee Teachers’ Education Association members are organizing a Saturday of art to fight for schools that are safe from gun violence. We choose our students, not guns.

The Art Build will take place Saturday, March 17 from 10:00am-6:00pm in the art ed. room in the basement of the UWM Kenilworth Square Building.

 

The community is invited to join us and our students in making banners, posters, and other pieces in preparation for the Milwaukee March 24 “March for Our Lives – Milwaukee.”
CALL FOR IMAGES!

Art for the “March For Our Lives” march in Milwaukee

Students and educators from MPS are encouraged to submit designs for either the poster or the banners.

MTEA is sponsoring this one-day art build. The plan is to screen print 2,000 posters with the message: “Protect Students, Not Guns” and to paint banners with the slogan “Never Again.” Students and educators from MPS are encouraged to submit designs for either the poster or the banners.

Specifics for the screen-printed poster:

• Size: 12.5″ x 19″ (can be a horizontal or vertical composition)
• One-color design. (It can printed in any color but please submit a one-color design)
• Text should read: Protect Students, Not Guns
• Leave space in the lower right corner for the MTEA logo to be added.
• Things to consider: Bold designs, bold images, bold text are best read in a crowd and by the camera.

Specifics for the banners:

• Banner designs will be projected and painted.
• Text can be: Never Again or Protect Students Not Guns
• Banners will be horizontal compositions. Around 4′ tall by 8′ long.
• Banners will be painted so best if the design is 1-3 colors max.

Things to consider:

Bold designs, bold images, bold texts are best read in a crowd and by the camera.

Deadline for the art submissions: Wednesday, March 14th
by 6:00pm. Please email designs to nicolaslampert23@gmail.com

Photo credit: Joe Brusky

 

Labor Notes Conference April 6-8, 2018 Chicago, Illinois

Labor-Notes-"Calling ALL MTEA Troublemakers"

We’re looking for MTEA member troublemakers to attend the biggest gathering of grassroots union activists in the nation!  Join the Labor Notes Conference for a powerful weekend and choose from over 100 workshops on organizing tactics, beating apathy, and winning campaigns.

Workshops and meetings begin Friday, April 6, and end at 3pm Sunday, April 8. Hear speakers from the frontline of recent struggles, including:

• Puerto Rican teachers fighting to keep their schools open in the wake of Hurricane Maria
• Massachusetts Teachers Association President Barbara Madeloni on how her union is preparing for Janus

Click here to learn more about other highlights. 

A limited number of discounted MTEA registration scholarships are available for MTEA members to help offset the conference costs.

Discounted Rate for MTEA Members Receiving Scholarships: 

MTEA Teacher Unit Members – $50
MTEA Educational Assistants, Substitute, or Accountant/Bookkeeper Unit Members – $20

MTEA Member Scholarship Rates Include:
• Discounted Friday-Sunday Labor Notes Conference registration fee
• A shared hotel room (private rooms are available for members who would like to pay for the other half of the cost at $158.50)
• Conference light breakfasts and a Saturday night banquet

Transportation costs and food outside of the conference are not included in the MTEA scholarship rates. We ask that members selected who can pay more, consider making a larger contribution to help us send as many members as possible.

Apply today for an MTEA Labor Notes Conference Scholarship!

Application deadline is Thurs., Feb. 22.

Applications will be presented to the MTEA Labor Notes Scholarship Committee. The scholarships will be awarded based on your responses and date of your response. All scholarship recipients will be notified of the Committee’s decision by Mon., Feb. 26, 2018.

MPS “Black Lives Matter at School” Week of Action Kicks Off

Students at King Elementary in Milwaukee, Wisconsin pose for a photo at their school’s “Black Lives Matter at School” kick-off event on Monday (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

Milwaukee Teachers’ Education Association (MTEA) membership voted unanimously to endorse the National “Black Lives Matter at School” Week of Action at the January Representative Assembly. The week of action, which was inspired by 2017 campaigns by educators in Seattle and Philadelphia has gone nationwide this year. The goal is to send a strong message to our students that their lives matter and that their future has a purpose. Here is the resolution that was passed unanimously:

            Whereas the Milwaukee Teachers’ Education Association has been a local leader in passing Black Lives Matter initiatives at the school and local level;

            Whereas zero tolerance policies and over-policing of our Black and Brown youth has proven to be ineffective in the reduction of discipline, and Restorative Practices has proven to be a powerful tool in the reduction of disproportionate discipline;

            Be it resolved that MTEA supports the national Black Lives Matter at School Week from February 5th to February 11th, 2018 and encourages its members to wear Black Lives Matter shirts during the week and teach lessons that address the School-to-Prison pipeline, Black women empowerment, Black LGBTQ community and Black History.

MTEA was invited to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Elementary and Rufus King International High School on Monday for the two school’s kick-off events. Check out some of the photos and video we captured from those two powerful events.

King Elementary students were welcomed to their kick-off with student drumming (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

MTEA member and King Elementary teacher Angela Harris organized her school’s kick-off (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

Students recited their school’s key principles which King Elementary entitles their “Kingian Values” (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

King Elementary students engage in their kick-off event activities (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

The King Elementary “Kingian Values” (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

A group of students at Rufus King International High School kicked off the week of action constructing this Black Lives Matter display on their school fence line out of disposable drinking cups (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

Students add the final exclamation point to their message (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

A final photo in front of their message (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

End the School-to-Prison pipeline (Photo credit: Joe Brusky).

 

We will continue to feature events happening in MPS around this week of action on our public Facebook and Twitter accounts so be sure to check back and share the great work MTEA members are engaging in to positively affirm and publicly support our students.

Week of Action Updates:

French Immersion students were busy Wednesday creating an all-school banner for the #BlackLivesMatterAtSchool national week of action. The completed banner will be used for an all school gathering with parents and community Friday. 

Photo credit: Joe Brusky

Photo credit: Joe Brusky

Photo credit: Joe Brusky

Photo credit: Joe Brusky

Photo credit: Joe Brusky

Photo credit: Joe Brusky

Photo credit: Joe Brusky

On Tuesday, students and staff at Rufus King High School wore the faces of victims of police brutality. We cannot forget the names and reasons for why we’re acting to positively affirm and publicly support our students.
Thanks to MTEA executive board member and Rufus King teacher Kelly O’Keefe-Boettcher for sending this powerful photo of her with her students.

Photo credit: Kelly O’Keefe Boettcher

Rufus King staff and students met and mapped out activities for the entire week.

Photo credit: Kelly O’Keefe Boettcher

The staff at Golda Meir – Lower Campus wore their new MTEA Black Lives Matter t-shirts to school Wednesday. Thanks for standing strong for your students!

Photo credit: Joe Brusky

What a beautiful sight! Check out the staff of Samuel Clemens wearing their Black Lives Matter shirts at school Wednesday.

Wedgewood educators wore their shirts on Wednesday!

Photo credit: Julie Meyer

The staff of Congress School proudly wore their #BlackLivesMatter shirts for their students Thursday. Thank you!

Photo credit: Joe Brusky

MTEA member and Douglass School art teacher John Fleissner worked with his students on a project for the week of action.

Hawthorne School staff holding it down for their students on Thursday (Photo credit: Hawthorne educator Arnold Branch).

The work of MTEA members has not gone unrecognized as Black Lives Matter co-founder Alicia Garza tweeted her support and the Washington Post also highlighted MTEA’s work.


Teaching resources, including lessons for the week of action can be found here.

MTEA Black Lives Matter t-shirts can be ordered for local pick-up at the Milwaukee Teachers’ Education Association office.

#BlackLivesMatter at School Kick-Off in MPS from MTEA Union on Vimeo.

Black Lives Matter At School Week

Black Lives Matter Week of Action in Our Schools
Feb. 5 – Feb. 11, 2018

MTEA is proud to support the national Black Lives Matter at School Week from February 5th to February 11th, 2018 and encourages all members to wear Black Lives Matter shirts during the week and teach lessons that address the School-to-Prison pipeline, Black women empowerment, Black LGBTQ community and Black history.

We invite your school to participate in the MTEA Black Lives Matter Week of Action in MPS schools from Feb. 5-9, 2018 to bring social justice issues into our classrooms.

Black-lives-matter-MTEA

MTEA BLM T-shirt Design

An order of union-made, union-printed Black Lives Matter T-shirts will arrive to the MTEA office by Wed., Jan. 31.

Click here to pre-order Black Lives Matter T-shirts. 

 

Black Lives Matter Resources:


Sign up here and participate

Milwaukee Teacher Removed From School Board Meeting for Testimony

Milwaukee public School teacher Ingrid Henry-Walker had her microphone cut and was escorted out by security for expressing her opinion at a board meeting Tuesday night (Photo: Joe Brusky).

Public school districts are strongest when they collaborate and work together with parents and community members. To facilitate a healthy and democratic school district, school board meetings need to be accessible to the public and allow for constructive criticism.

The uptick in reports of publicly elected school boards restricting citizen comments is disturbing. Taxpayers should be able to openly criticize school district decisions, whether it’s a policy around recess, raises, or rent. Public voice should be heard and valued.

This week a video of Louisiana teacher Dayshia Hargrave went viral. Hargrave was speaking at a local school board meeting when her testimony was abruptly cut off and a law enforcement officer aggressively handcuffed her. Her violation: questioning the superintendent’s raise while other district educators had their pay frozen.

Louisiana teacher Dayshia Hargrave was violently handcuffed and arrested for simply expressing her opinion at a school board meeting.

A similar scene played out in Milwaukee on Tuesday night. Ingrid Walker-Henry, a Milwaukee Public Schools educator and the co-chair of a local coalition advocating for public schools in Milwaukee, testified against a lease extension for a private MPS charter school. While the committee chair, Michael Bonds, allowed off-topic and unsubstantiated testimony from supporters of the private charter, he abruptly cut off Ingrid Walker-Henry’s mic for speaking too broadly about the need for fair market lease rates on private charters that use public buildings.

Once her microphone was cut, Walker-Henry turned to the crowd and used her teacher voice to finish her testimony before she was escorted out of the building by district security.

Here is Walker-Henry’s full public testimony that was not allowed by School Board Director, Michael Bonds:

“We are calling on MPS to be more responsible with taxpayer dollars. There needs to be a fair market value lease rate that is charged to privately owned and operated charter schools.

School Board Minutes from 2006 reflect that MPS once had a board approved charter rate of $12/square foot. The current lease for Carmen Northwest is less than half of the 2006 board recommendation and some of the other charters come in at even less.

This raises serious concerns about the way you negotiate leases with private operators.

Last year, Universal Academies taught the District a hard lesson about these leases:
• The original leases approved for Universal in 2013 were for 5 years. Green Bay paid roughly $400,000 per year, Webster $380,000 per year and the Lee campus was for just $101,000 a year.

• In April 2016, the board actually lowered the lease rates for two Universal locations for the 2016-2017 school year.

• And as we all know, Universal DID NOT operate its fifth year in 2017-2018. They turned in their keys and abandoned some of the most economically disadvantaged students in our city. As a result of Universal’s failure, the district only received approximately $1 million total from each school, about half as much as the lease was for.
• The closing of Webster cost the district an additional $1 million.

We need privately owned and operated schools to pay a fair market value. I hope the school board revisits the entire policy regarding non-instrumentality charter leases to make sure they are paying their fair share and are not doing harm to the 76,000 students and families you were elected to govern and are responsible for and not the bad partners like Carmen who is actively working to put a city charter in the same building as one of your public schools.”

Democratic school boards have a moral obligation to provide a forum where local citizens can give meaningful input, both positive and negative, about the actions of the district.