Election Watch: WEAC PAC recommends Josh Kaul for Attorney General

The WEAC Political Action Committee is recommending Josh Kaul for Wisconsin Attorney General, and now it’s members’ turn to weigh in on whether they support that. Members can weigh in using WEAC’s online feedback form. The deadline is 5 p.m. Wednesday, June 13.

More Election News:

Friday filing deadline for gubernatorial candidates. Friday is the filing deadline for gubernatorial candidates, and this weekend is the Democratic Convention in Oshkosh. At the same time, Governor Walker dropped the fourth TV ad of his re-election campaign. He’s getting an extra push from the state GOP, which started a digital ad campaign and website called www.dangerousraceleft.com. The candidates who have met requirements to speak at the Democratic Convention are:

  • State schools Superintendent Tony Evers
  • Attorney Matt Flynn
  • Businessman Andy Gronik
  • State firefighters union President Mahlon Mitchell
  • Activist Mike McCabe
  • Former State Representative Kelda Roys
  • Madison Mayor Paul Soglin
  • State Senator Kathleen Vinehout
  • State Representative Dan Wachs
  • Kenosha attorney and activist Josh Pade

While the big 10 are gearing up, Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett announced he will not run for governor, putting to rest six weeks of public speculation on whether he would make another bid for the governor’s office.

Special elections June 12 in SD 1 and AD 42. WEAC is recommending Caleb Frostman in the former, and Ann Groves Lloyd in the latter.

Supreme Court Justice Shirley Abrahamson won’t run again. The longtime justice announced Wednesday she’ll pass on another election bid (but fill out her term). A respected Justice and human being who was appointed in 1976 and then rose to chief justice, Abrahamson reflected the promise of separate and equal branches of government in her decisions – never wavering to corporate influence even as those around her crumbled. Appeals Court Judge Brian Hagedorn, who was appointed to the bench by Governor Scott Walker, has indicated interest, along with Court of Appeals Chief Judge Lisa Neubauer.

Banks looks to replace Young. Milwaukee’s Assembly District 16 is up-for-grabs now that Representative Leon Young announced he’s not seeking re-election, and community organizer Rick Banks has filed to run as a Democrat. Supreme Moore Omokunde, son of U.S. Representative Gwen Moore, is also considering a run. Candidates have until next Monday to turn in signatures.

Brooks backs Kurtz. After Ed Brooks announced he’s not running again in AD 50, he decided to be treasurer for Republican Tony Kurtz’s campaign to replace him.

Related Reading:
Democratic candidates jockeying for position ahead of state convention
Campaign Cash: WMC Brags About Legislative Victories
Kind’s GOP challenger Toft accuses Facebook of censorship
Mike McCabe Turns in 4,000 Nomination Signatures on Birthday
The State of Politics: Six Questions for Democratic Convention
Dems determined to be ready for WI governor nominee
In WI, do too many Democrats want to be governor?
Senator Baldwin’s new ad
Democratic AG candidate Josh Kaul: Department of Justice needs “new leadership”
Western WI voters have Walker’s attention, but does he have their votes?
WI lawmakers got $164K in travel and perks last year from outside groups
Assembly Speaker Robin Vos’s payday loan London junket travel buddy’s home raided by FBI
John Nichols: Wisconsin Democrats must go bold
Editorial: A fix-the-roads Republican should mount an anti-Scottholes challenge to Walker

This is an 11.0101(10)(b)(1) communication with WEAC members.

Election Watch – May 15

WEAC recommends education-friendly candidates in special elections

WEAC is recommending candidates who prioritize students and public schools in the June 12 special election. The recommendations come as Republican candidates selected their candidates in Tuesday’s partisan primary (André Jacque in Senate District 1 and Jon Plumer in Assembly District 42).

WEAC RECOMMENDS:

Senate District 1: Caleb Frostman of Sturgeon Bay

  • Supports investments in our public schools and technical colleges.
  • Advocates for affordable healthcare and childcare for Wisconsin workers.
  • A product of Wisconsin’s public schools and universities.
  • Executive Director of the Door County Economic Development Corporation, with experience in commercial real estate finance.

Assembly District 42: Ann Groves Lloyd of Lodi

  • Believes Wisconsin should work to provide health care to all.
  • Supports protections to our environment and natural resources.
  • Earned B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. at UW-Madison.
  • UW-Madison Director of Career Services with experience as adviser, career services director and associate dean, as well as an alderperson on the Lodi Common Council.

Other Election Updates:

In the governor’s race, news reports say Democrats are planning to quickly pivot after the August 14 general election to avoid being caught flat-footed in the Wisconsin governor’s race. Democrat Mike Crute has dropped out of race for governor, even after he participated in a forum over the weekend. Here are the audio recordings:

On the Republican side, the governor opened applications to a $100-per-child tax rebate timed in conjunction with his election bid, and told agencies to plan for 0% growth in their 2019-21 budgets. He also unveiled his third TV ad. His first ad talks about efforts to bolster worker training in the state, but features a firefighter who did not benefit directly from the program being touted. One Wisconsin Now called the ad misleading, but Walker’s campaign defended it, noting that the EMT and firefighter in the ad said Walker is helping people “like me,” not her specifically.

Barca passes on congressional bid. Kenosha Democrat PeterBarca is passing on a bid for the congressional seat (CD 1, being vacated by Paul Ryan) he held more than 20 years ago, saying it would take a “Herculean effort to piece together a winning campaign” considering the head start others have.

Related Reading:
With GOP U.S. Senate endorsement in hand, Leah Vukmir prepares to tour party offices
CD 1 candidate Cathy Myers took homestead credit in Illinois while living and voting in Wisconsin
Robin Vos, other Wisconsin lawmakers billed taxpayers $4,300 for one-day trip to Ohio
Republican State Rep. Ed Brooks of Reedsburg won’t seek AD 50 re-election

This is an 11.0101(10)(b)(1) communication with WEAC members.

WEAC Election Update – Who’s not running again?

Rep. Joel Kleefisch, R-Oconomowoc, is the latest Wisconsin legislator indicating he won’t seek re-election this fall. Kleefisch has served in the Legislature since 2004. Here’s an overview:

Assembly

  1. Joel Kleefisch (R) – Not seeking re-election to AD-32
  2. Tom Weatherston (R) – Not seeking re-election to AD-62
  3. Andre Jacque (R) – Not seeking re-election to the AD-2, running for SD-1.
  4. Dale Kooyenga (R) – Not seeking re-election to the AD-14, running for SD-5
  5. Adam Jarchow (R) – Not seeking re-election to AD-28
  6. Jesse Kremer (R) – Not seeking re-election to AD-59
  7. Tom Weatherston (R) – Not seeking re-election to AD-62.
  8. Kathy Bernier (R) – Not seeking re-election to AD-68, running for SD-23.
  9. Terese Berceau (D) – Not seeking re-election to AD-77
  10. Eric Genrich (D) – Not seeking re-election to AD-90, running for Mayor of Green Bay
  11. Dana Wachs (D) – Not seeking re-election to AD-91, running for Governor
  12. Lee Nerison (R) – Not seeking re-election to AD-96

Senate

  1. Leah Vukmir (R) – Not seeing re-election to SD-5, running for U.S. Senate
  2. Terry Moulton (R) – Not seeking re-election to SD-23
  3. Kathleen Vinehout (D) – Not seeking re-election to SD-31, running for Governor

U.S Congress

  1. Paul Ryan (R) – Not seeing re-election to CD-1.

Supreme Court to consider DPI’s independent authority again

The Wisconsin Supreme Court will again take up a case about the independent authority of the elected state superintendent.

The Court is responding to a lawsuit from the conservative Wisconsin Institute for Law & Liberty (WILL) over the DPI’s independent rule-making authority. State Superintendent Tony Evers won a case affirming his independent authority in a 5-2 ruling back in 2016, with conservatives in the majority on the bench.

“Educators are scratching their heads at this latest move by the far-right to play by different rules than our Constitution calls for,” said WEAC President Ron Martin, a middle school social studies teacher.

In fact, the court’s conservative majority gave no explanation for why it is taking the case. The decision puts the case on a fast track, bypassing the court of appeals. Justices Ann Walsh Bradley and Shirley Abrahamson disagreed with taking up the case again, saying the issue had been addressed in Coyne v. Walker. Madison Teachers Inc. and WEAC were successful in asserting the state constitution gives the state superintendent authority to set education policy for the state. Back in 2016, Justices Bradley, Abrahamson, David Prosser and Michael Gableman agreed.

Gableman, who is retiring, will be replaced this summer by Rebecca Dallet. Meanwhile Prosser has been replaced by Governor Walker appointee Dan Kelly.

Oral arguments are set for May 15, and the Court said it would initially take up only the narrow issue of who will represent Evers in the case – whether it has to be the governor’s pick, Attorney General Brad Schimel, or if Evers can use a DPI attorney who is not tied to the governor.

Schimel is closely aligned with the governor, and Evers is one of several Democrats running for the seat this fall.

WEAC Election Update: State, local results – and what’s next

Election results
Milwaukee County Judge Rebecca Dallet – recommended by the WEAC Board – won a 10-year seat on the Wisconsin Supreme Court Tuesday. WEAC had cited Dallet’s 21 years of experience, support for the role of unions in the workplace and support for public education. Dallet will be seated in August. Voters also decided to keep the State Treasurer’s Office, a position supported by public education advocates. And they approved the five largest school referendums in the state.

WEAC members in their communities worked within their districts on several of the referendums, including the Beloit Turner referendum that is reported to have lost by just two votes.

WEAC President Ron Martin, an eighth grade social studies teacher, credited the work educators are doing to raise awareness about how the politics of recent years has hurt students and schools. “The pendulum is swinging back to restore Democracy; it’s time and we’re not slowing down,” he said. “Wisconsin educators voted with their students in mind, and we’ll always vote for our students.”

Referendums
Voters supported 55 of 66 local school referendums — 83 percent — in Tuesday’s election, indicating communities are supportive of their public schools and willing to step up to fund them to make up for what the state has cut over the past few years. The passage rate is up from the fall elections, where 70 percent of referendum questions were approved, and the spring 2017 elections where 62 percent of referendum questions passed. Tuesday, the five largest referendums in the state all passed:

  • Chippewa Falls, $65 million
  • C. Everest, $60 million
  • River Falls, $48 million
  • Sparta , $32.5 million (two referendums)
  • Plymouth, $32 million

Of the nine largest referendums, seven passed and one of the others – in the Beloit Turner School District – is headed for recount after losing by only two votes.

A new law will benefit 13 of the districts with successful operating referendums, which are now eligible to receive a low revenue bump via an increased revenue ceiling for the next three years. That’s funding that can be used to improve student opportunities, hire educators and increase pay. The districts are:

  • Adams-Friendship
  • Almond-Bancroft
  • Benton
  • Ellsworth
  • Howard-Suamico
  • Kiel
  • Manitowoc
  • Markesan
  • Merrill
  • Mondovi
  • Randall J1
  • Shullsburg
  • Westby

See the complete list of school referendums here.

School Board Elections
Members of our local associations also recommended candidates in several school board elections, supporting candidates who support public school students.

Up Next: Special Elections
This is a big year in Wisconsin elections, and we’re already watching the next races shape up. After the governor was forced by the rulings of two judges to hold special elections in open Legislative seats, a field of candidates is coming forward. In Senate District 1 (Northeastern Wisconsin), Republicans Alex Renard and Andre Jacque have stepped forward. In Assembly District 42 (Southcentral Wisconsin), Democrats Ann Lloyd and Nicolas Schneider have announced their candidacies, along with Republicans Spencer Zimmerman and Jon Plumer. A special election primary election is set May 15, with the special election slated June 12.

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Judge Rebecca Dallet wins Supreme Court race

Milwaukee County Judge Rebecca Dallet – recommended by the WEAC Board – won a 10-year seat on the Wisconsin Supreme Court Tuesday. WEAC had cited Dallet’s 10 years of judicial experience, support for the role of unions in the workplace, and support for public education as a core value. Dallet, who won with 56% of the vote, will be seated in August.

Voters also overwhelmingly decided to keep the State Treasurer’s Office, a position supported by public education advocates. The vote to eliminate the State Treasurer’s Office was 61% to 39%.

“The pendulum is swinging back to Democracy; it’s time and we’re not slowing down,” said WEAC President Ron Martin. “Wisconsin educators voted with their students in mind, and we’ll always vote for our students. Next up are June’s long-awaited special elections in Senate District 1 (eastern Wisconsin) and Assembly District 42 (south-central Wisconsin) and then the important November General Election, which includes the governor’s race.”

Wisconsin educators recommended Rebecca Dallet for the Supreme Court based on her qualifications including 21 years of experience on the bench, another sign that voters are soundly rejecting the Scott Walker agenda, Martin said. “Social studies teachers like me join voters across the state in taking the first steps to returning to three separate branches of government and Democracy,” Martin said.

Also on Tuesday, voters decided 66 local school referendums, and results indicated voters were overwhelmingly supportive of spending for public school improvements. The five largest referendums in the state passed – $65 million Chippewa Falls, $60 million in D.C. Everest, $48 million in River Falls, $32.5 million (two referendums) in Sparta, and $32 million in Plymouth. Of the nine largest referendums, seven passed and one of the others – in the Beloit Turner School District – is headed for recount after losing by only two votes. With results of 50 of the 66 referendums in, voters approved 45, or 90%, of them.

Read more:

Bice: Gov. Scott Walker a big loser among 5 takeaways from Wisconsin’s spring election

Here are a few quick thoughts on Tuesday’s spring general election results: 1. Gov. Scott Walker got the message – loud and clear: The biggest losers in the state on Tuesday were the St. Louis Cardinals ( walk-off homer by Ryan Braun), the Boston Celtics ( swatted away by Giannis) and Walker.

Rebecca Dallet beats Michael Screnock in race for Wisconsin Supreme Court

MADISON – Rebecca Dallet bested Michael Screnock Tuesday for a seat on the state Supreme Court, shrinking the court’s conservative majority and giving Democrats a jolt of energy heading into the fall election. It marked the first time in 23 years that a liberal candidate who wasn’t an incumbent won a seat on the high court.

Wisconsin voters choose to keep state treasurer’s office

Wisconsin will continue to employ a state treasurer after voters rejected a call to eliminate the position Tuesday. Republicans said the position is unnecessary, but backers argued it is an important check on other elected officials. Elimination of the office of state treasurer.